Safe Mountaineering
Mountain Safety
1.
Note the size of the group as well as the age, sex, and mountaineering experience of the group members. Don't overestimate the competence of yourself and the group members;
2.
Choose the popular paths/trails. Villages, stores and telephones en route will serve as points of supplies and help;
3.
Choose the paths which are preserved by the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department and trek along the planned paths. Don't take short cuts and paths which are not clearly way-marked;
4.
Leave an information sheet on the journey and the personal particulars of the group members to your family, friends or the organisation responsible for the activity. In case of emergency or journey overdue, the information will be useful for them to seek help from the police;
5.
Leave a reference on the journey and the relevant information to the local police station before the journey starts. Don't forget to cancel the reference when the journey ends;
6.
In summer months, plan a route with watercourses and spots shaded by trees. Leave more time for rest. Don't plan a prolonged journey;
7.
Change or cancel the activity plan if inclement weather is forecasted.


Hiking Safety
1.
Note the weather conditions before setting out. Pay special attention to the likelihood of thunderstorms, heavy rain or sudden drop of temperature;
2.
Familiarize yourself with the area to be trekked. Note the locations of police stations, country park management centres as well as emergency call telephones in the vicinity;
3.
Pay attention to the fire danger warning signals. Don't start a fire if the weather is dry;
4.
Put on suitable clothes and footwear. Bring along a sun cap and a walking stick;
5.
Bring along the following items:
maps, compass, first-aid kit, torch, whistle, notebook, pen, warm protective clothing, rain gear, emergency ration, sufficient drinking water, communication equipment, such as mobile phone;
6.
Put all the above items in the rucksack so that your hands would be free in trekking and mountaineering;
7.
Go hiking in groups. Make sure that there are members with hiking experience and first-aid knowledge in the group;
8.
If get lost in the mountain, retrace your steps along the original route. Don't force your way further;
9.
Should accident happen during journey, seek help immediately.


Camping Safety
1.
Choose suitable campsites. Never set your tents on cliffs/steep slopes or in the vicinity of military firing range or amid dense vegetation. Also consider whether the campsites are under the impact of waves and mountain torrents. It is preferable to camp at the campsites provided by the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department;
2.
Pay attention to the fire danger warning signals. Don't let any tinders burn unattended. Before leaving the campsite, put out the fire to prevent the embers from glowing again;
3.
Pay attention to the fire danger warning signals. Don't start a fire if the weather is dry;
4.
When setting the tents, make sure that the pegs are completely pressed into the ground. Pull out all the pegs when leaving the campsite.
5.
Fasten some colorful tags to the guy lines to avoid stumble in the night;
6.
Use folding knives carefully to avoid careless injury;
7.
Place cooking utensils on a steady surface to avoid accidents caused by the overturned stove;
8.
Bring along first-aid kit and make sure that there are group members who have first-aid knowledge;
9.
Never cook inside the tent.


Distress Guide
1.
You may send out the International Mountain Distress Signals and the Morse Code Distress Signals with the following articles:
Whistle, torch, lamp light
2. Ways of sending the International Mountain Distress Signals Signals:
 
A.
sending out six long blasts within one minute;
B.
pause for one minute;
C.
repeat (A) and (B);
3.
Ways of sending the Morse Code Distress Signals:
Sending out blasts in the sequence of three short, three long , three short;
4.
Waving colouful or shinny clothes to attract the attention of the rescue party or others;
5.
If distress is made through mobile phone, first clarify the exact location of where you are. Then find a better coverage spot to call the police. To save the battery, avoid unnecessary communication which may hinder the rescuers from communicating with you;
6.

Never send someone go downhill alone for help. The party should be composed of at least two persons and carry a distress information sheet for the police to take necessary action.

Details of the distress information sheet:

 
A.
Time, exact location and grid reference of the accident;
B.
Terrain and special landmarks in the vicinity;
C.
Number of the injured and number of persons on spot;
D.
Condition of the injured;
E.
First aid given;
F.
Aid needed;
G.
Personal particulars of the injured.
INFORMATION:
CAS Mountain Search & Rescue Company
Useful Telephone No.
Weather Information for Hiking & Mountaineering
Mountaineering Safety Leaflet(Chinese Version Only)
 
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Last Revision Date: 01/08/2017